At This Point in Time: “D-Day” Invasion

As we are approaching the 71st anniversary of the event, let’s take an astrological look back on what took place that fateful day, when the tide of the war changed for the embattled peoples of Europe.

The History

 

Dwight D. Eisenhower chose Monday, June 5 1944, as D-Day, the date for invading Europe. The success of the invasion depended heavily on calm seas and clear skies. On Saturday, June 3, the weather turned bad. Weather experts reported that gusty winds and high waves would make it impossible for landing craft to cross the English Channel on Monday. Eisenhower ordered a 24-hour delay until Tuesday, June 6. On Sunday, the weatherman predicted calmer weather for the next 48 hours, but poor conditions after that.

Eisenhower faced one of the gravest decisions of the entire war. He could send the first wave of troops across the channel as planned. Or he could postpone the entire operation for two weeks, until the channel would have low tides again. But, by then, the closely guarded invasion secret would probably have leaked out.

At 4 a.m. on June 5, Eisenhower held a final staff meeting. His chief of staff, Brigadier General Walter Bedell Smith, later wrote: “…He sat there…tense, weighing every consideration…Finally, he looked up, and the tension was gone from his face. He said briskly, ‘Well, we’ll go.’

The first wave of troops crossed the choppy channel at 6:30 a.m. on June 6, 1944. By nightfall, the Allies had a firm hold on a long area of beach. After 11 months of bloody fighting, Germany surrendered on May 7, 1945.

Operation Overlord

 

Position of Planets on the day:

Sun 15 Gem 20
Moon 7 Sag 47
Mercury 22 Tau 15
Venus 9 Gem 36
Mars 8 Leo 29
Jupiter 21 Leo 09
Saturn 28 Gem 10
Uranus 9 Gem 19
Neptune 1 Lib 28
Pluto 6 Leo 54

N Node 28 Can 21
Asc 25 Gem 07
MC 19 Aqu 23
2nd cusp 12 Can 07
3rd cusp 28 Can 57
5th cusp 19 Vir 06
6th cusp 5 Sco 46

http://www.members.shaw.ca/junobeach/juno-2.htm

The Human Spirit

There are a couple of features about this chart which first caught my eye. For instance, there is a Sun, Venus and Uranus conjunction opposed by the Moon. At a harmonious angle to this opposition is a powerful Pluto-Mars conjunction. And conjunct to the Ascendant is that old task-master Saturn.

To me, the most significant of these aspects is the one which is the conjunction between Pluto and Mars. In March of 1987, the Townsend Thoresen ferry, Herald of Free Enterprise capsized outside Zeebrugge during a very violent storm. This storm happened during the time of a Mars-Pluto opposition. That same evening, Friday the 6th, I was on an Intercity train bound for Newton Abbot at the height of the storm. The train was delayed at Dawlish due to huge waves lapping the tracks. Somehow, the Mars-Pluto connection causes ‘bad weather’ and all anyone can do is sit out the storm. So, too, with the Mars-Pluto conjunction in 1944: the weather was stormy on the day of the exact alignment, the 3rd of June, but cleared when this aspect became sextile (60°) to the Sun-Venus-Uranus conjunction and trine (120°) to the Moon on the 6th. At the same time, Saturn, the timekeeper, came to the horizon (i.e. conjunct to the Ascendant) and said, “Now!

Quite literally, the choice of “D-Day” must have been inspired. But by whom? Was someone in the War Office consulting an Astrologer? Or was Dwight D. Eisenhower ‘tuned-in’ to the Cosmos? Whatever the answers are to these questions, there can be no doubt that the outcome of World War II hinged on the timing of the Normandy landings. It must have been at such a time as this that the leaders of the Allied forces thanked their lucky stars!

http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/dv2Wi-hFlJ8?rel=0

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About cdsmiller17

I am an Astrologer who also writes about world events. My first eBook "At This Point in Time" is available through most on-line book stores. I have now serialized my second book "The Star of Bethlehem" here. And to give my blog pages something lighter, I'm sharing some of my personal photographs, too.
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